Monthly Archives: May 2013

Breathing too deeply can do more harm than good

This is from DailyMail UK:

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In fact, Professor Ian Macdonald, professor of metabolic physiology at the School of Biomedical Sciences in Derbyshire, warns breathing too deeply can do more harm than good.

‘Inhaling and exhaling too deeply can disturb the balance between carbon dioxide and oxygen in the body needed to neutralise the blood. This can cause light headedness and even make someone faint.’
Complete article at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-54709/Can-really-lose-weight-breathing.html#ixzz2TzzMe9vX

Mouth Breathing vs. Nose Breathing [shared]

Here’s an article from www.livestrong.com on mouth breathing vs. nose breathing.

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Effects of Mouth Breathing

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, or AGD, mouth breathing is often a problem for allergy sufferers, who experience airway obstruction during allergy season and are unable to breathe through their noses. Mouth breathing can lead to poor oxygen concentration in the bloodstream, which can lead to more serious medical problems such as high blood pressure, heart problems, sleep apnea and other sleeping problems.

DANGERS OF MOUTH BREATHING IN CHILDREN

Mouth breathing can be especially detrimental in children, who may suffer abnormal facial and dental development as a result. Left untreated, mouth breathing may lead to narrow faces, crooked teeth or gummy smiles. The AGD also reports that children who breathe through their mouths typically have sleeping problems, which can lead to poor academic performance and is often misdiagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. In a 2009 study performed at the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil, mouth breathers experienced higher rates of poor bite and misalignment of teeth.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/213246-mouth-breathing-vs-nose-breathing/#ixzz2TuGMiiON

Negative impact of mouth breathing on children’s teeth development

This short video is an interview with ENT Dr. Madan Kandula discussing the negative impact of mouth breathing on children’s teeth development, and that’s exactly one of the topic that Buteyko Breathing Technique really addresses about. Mouth breathing children have a high potential of developing crooked teeth and abnormal jaw, which not only would require orthodontic works later on, but also become more prone to breathing related symptoms.

Asthma awareness month!

 

National Asthma and allergy awareness month

image credit: Asthma and Allergy foundation of America

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that May is the Asthma and Allergy Awareness month?
And also that
 the first Tuesday of May is the Asthma Awareness Day set by the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)! Which would be May 7th for this year.

So, let’s use this as a reminder to check up our CP value again, and spend some time to review the Buteyko reduced breathing exercises. A couple nights of mouth taping would also be perfect for the theme! Just to make sure that the bad old habit of over breathing isn’t coming back again.